Bring the noise

Could a hotel be built on the land owned by Supreme Court Justice David H. Souter? A new ruling by the Supreme Court which was supported by Justice Souter himself itself might allow it. A private developer is seeking to use this very law to build a hotel on Souter’s land.

Justice Souter’s vote in the “Kelo vs. City of New London” decision allows city governments to take land from one private owner and give it to another if the government will generate greater tax revenue or other economic benefits when the land is developed by the new owner.

On Monday June 27, Logan Darrow Clements, faxed a request to Chip Meany the code enforcement officer of the Towne of Weare, New Hampshire seeking to start the application process to build a hotel on 34 Cilley Hill Road. This is the present location of Mr. Souter’s home.

Clements, CEO of Freestar Media, LLC, points out that the City of Weare will certainly gain greater tax revenue and economic benefits with a hotel on 34 Cilley Hill Road than allowing Mr. Souter to own the land.

The proposed development, called “The Lost Liberty Hotel” will feature the “Just Desserts CafĂ©” and include a museum, open to the public, featuring a permanent exhibit on the loss of freedom in America. Instead of a Gideon’s Bible each guest will receive a free copy of Ayn Rand’s novel “Atlas Shrugged.”

Let’s see some eminent domain in action, ladies and gentlemen. Anyone know where Susan B. Ginsberg lives?

More fiction in the legacy media

From WND:

A longtime columnist of the Sacramento Bee who resigned amid controversy last month may have invented the existence of 43 people she wrote about over several years, an internal investigation found.

The paper announced yesterday it had completed a probe into Diana Griego Erwin’s writing, stating: “We have been unable to verify the existence of 43 people she named in her columns. This doesn’t prove these people don’t exist, but despite extensive research we have been unable to find them.”

I blame it on those untrustworthy blogs…. I’m just wondering, how many of these “isolated incidents” have to occur before we can conclude that there’s a pattern of journalistic fiction?

Perhaps we should ask the media’s official “the man on the street”, Greg Packer, what he makes of all this.